Corporate Training - become more effective

Quite simply, what I do when I work as a trainer is to work with different stakeholders to understand the critical communication situations and business processes which the trainees will have to operate in, and design and run courses which will help people do so. The aim is always to make people more effective and efficient in their jobs, so that the organisation has a clear and noticeable benefit. It’s about adding value. 

 

Over the years I have trained employees and written training materials for a wide range of levels and functions, from board level to team assistant, and from HR to finance, production, logistics, purchasing, sales and marketing. Clients have come from many places and have included large corporate training departments such as Siemens Learning Campus and Audi Academy, ELT organisations such as Cambridge English Language Assessment and EDI, as well as groups and individuals from a range of industries including oil and gas, maritime, construction, accounting and finance, logistics, retail, real estate, automotive engineering, and many others.

Here are three examples of training seminars I have run recently. 

English for Asia 

Many German employees have to use English to operate in Asia. I have developed a two day seminar which focuses on the key communication skills such as rapport building, working in intercultural teams, and negotiating. Trainees get the chance to work with different Asian accents, analyse what is really being said in meetings, and develop their English language skills to work more effectively in an Asian context. Depending on the class I generally use Working in Asia 
which I co-authored with Shuna Hsu.


Presentations coaching 

Many people need to hone their presentation skills, both in terms of English language competence, and also as presenters. Making successful presentations starts with understanding the types of audiences involved, and also the type of presentations - for example, is it a sales presentation designed to persuade an audience to buy a product or service, or is it a technical presentation explaining how something works? Once the context of the presentation has been understood then the aim is to help that person do the best he or she possibly can - this can mean a variety of things, ranging from working through the content of a presentation, thinking about the structure, finding the right words and phrases, and so on. 

English for Accounting 

As the world moves towards IFRS there is a need for more and more accountants to be able to become familiar with the language required. Training in this area focuses on the specialist words and phrases used by accountants, but may also involve other skills such as clarifying and summarising complex rules and regulations for clients. This is an area I have worked in for a number of years, and indeed have co-authored English for Accounting,
now in its second edition, as well as working as Chief Examiner of LCCI's English for Accounting. And here is a link to a presentation that I did for Cambridge English Language Assessment about teaching English for accounting and financial professionals.